RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
Contact your state lawmakers. If you would like to get involved and do something productive, you don’t need to donate any money or collect any signatures. You simply need to contact your elected representatives and make them aware that an alternative solution exists for establishing free elections - an election process that does not require abolishing the bipartisan system. Do: Identify yourself as a constituent. Give your full name and address. Be polite and respectful Don’t: Make threats or accusations Send automated emails from a list. Roughly 33% of Oregon voters supported the nonpartisan top-two initiatives that failed here in recent years. We need 50% support to be successful. By providing a process that is fair to major party candidates and abandoning the requirement that the bipartisan system be abolished - we should be able to pick up more support. Specifically, we need the support of Democrats. Consolidating the Progressive Vote Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need to all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the general election. The results of the 2016 election for Oregon Secretary of State illustrates the problem quite well. Oregon is a “blue” state. The number of registered Democrats far exceeds registered Republicans. Consequently, Republicans had not won a statewide race in decades until 2016. As shown above, the Republican candidate only garnered 47% of the vote. This is not nearly the 50% needed to win outright. Nonetheless, the Republican candidate was still elected because three progressive candidates split nearly 50% of the vote. Vote splitting in the general election has become a critical issue for Democrats. Al Gore lost the U.S. Presidential election in 2000 because Ralph Nader siphoned off votes in Florida. It’s also widely believed that Jill Stein may have cost Hillary Clinton the 2016 presidential race by siphoning off progressive votes in Michigan. Add to this the fact that in both 2000 and 2016, the Democrats won the popular vote for president, but nonetheless lost in the electoral college. A partisan+top-two election process provides a solution to both problems: Vote splitting in the general election and abolishing the electoral college. Unfortunately, Democrats need to decide this for themselves, and in the current political environment, that doesn’t appear to be happening. However, if Democrats lose another U.S. Presidential election in 2020, 2024,...
GET INVOLVED
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018
RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
Contact your state lawmakers. If you would like to get involved and do something productive, you don’t need to donate any money or collect any signatures. You simply need to contact your elected representatives and make them aware that an alternative solution exists for establishing free elections - an election process that does not require abolishing the bipartisan system. Do: Identify yourself as a constituent. Give your full name and address. Be polite and respectful Don’t: Make threats or accusations Send automated emails from a list. Roughly 33% of Oregon voters supported the nonpartisan top-two initiatives that failed here in recent years. We need 50% support to be successful. By providing a process that is fair to major party candidates and abandoning the requirement that the bipartisan system be abolished - we should be able to pick up more support. Specifically, we need the support of Democrats. Consolidating the Progressive Vote Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need to all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the general election. The results of the 2016 election for Oregon Secretary of State illustrates the problem quite well. Oregon is a “blue” state. The number of registered Democrats far exceeds registered Republicans. Consequently, Republicans had not won a statewide race in decades until 2016. As shown above, the Republican candidate only garnered 47% of the vote. This is not nearly the 50% needed to win outright. Nonetheless, the Republican candidate was still elected because three progressive candidates split nearly 50% of the vote. Vote splitting in the general election has become a critical issue for Democrats. Al Gore lost the U.S. Presidential election in 2000 because Ralph Nader siphoned off votes in Florida. It’s also widely believed that Jill Stein may have cost Hillary Clinton the 2016 presidential race by siphoning off progressive votes in Michigan. Add to this the fact that in both 2000 and 2016, the Democrats won the popular vote for president, but nonetheless lost in the electoral college. A partisan+top-two election process provides a solution to both problems: Vote splitting in the general election and abolishing the electoral college. Unfortunately, Democrats need to decide this for themselves, and in the current political environment, that doesn’t appear to be happening. However, if Democrats lose another U.S. Presidential election in 2020, 2024,...
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018
GET INVOLVED
RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
Contact your state lawmakers. If you would like to get involved and do something productive, you don’t need to donate any money or collect any signatures. You simply need to contact your elected representatives and make them aware that an alternative solution exists for establishing free elections - an election process that does not require abolishing the bipartisan system. Do: Identify yourself as a constituent. Give your full name and address. Be polite and respectful Don’t: Make threats or accusations Send automated emails from a list. Roughly 33% of Oregon voters supported the nonpartisan top-two initiatives that failed here in recent years. We need 50% support to be successful. By providing a process that is fair to major party candidates and abandoning the requirement that the bipartisan system be abolished - we should be able to pick up more support. Specifically, we need the support of Democrats. Consolidating the Progressive Vote Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need to all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the general election. The results of the 2016 election for Oregon Secretary of State illustrates the problem quite well. Oregon is a “blue” state. The number of registered Democrats far exceeds registered Republicans. Consequently, Republicans had not won a statewide race in decades until 2016. As shown above, the Republican candidate only garnered 47% of the vote. This is not nearly the 50% needed to win outright. Nonetheless, the Republican candidate was still elected because three progressive candidates split nearly 50% of the vote. Vote splitting in the general election has become a critical issue for Democrats. Al Gore lost the U.S. Presidential election in 2000 because Ralph Nader siphoned off votes in Florida. It’s also widely believed that Jill Stein may have cost Hillary Clinton the 2016 presidential race by siphoning off progressive votes in Michigan. Add to this the fact that in both 2000 and 2016, the Democrats won the popular vote for president, but nonetheless lost in the electoral college. A partisan+top-two election process provides a solution to both problems: Vote splitting in the general election and abolishing the electoral college. Unfortunately, Democrats need to decide this for themselves, and in the current political environment, that doesn’t appear to be happening. However, if Democrats lose another U.S. Presidential election in 2020, 2024,...
GET INVOLVED
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018