Where we should not go.

What is a “Closed” Primary?
Lets Try voting for the greater of the two evils this time and see what happens.
Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
A “closed” primary is a type of direct primary limited to party members - voters and candidates who declare their party affiliation* in order to participate. 1. All non-affiliated candidates are excluded. 2. All non-affiliated voters are excluded. *Traditionally, voters declared party affiliation by “registering” as party members prior to the election. More recently, many states have adopted “Relaxed Registration Requirements” (R 3 ). In these states, voters are allowed to declare party affiliation by simply requesting or choosing a partisan ballot - as late as the day of the election.
There are only 3 types of primary election: 1. Open: all voters and candidates participate equally in selecting the top candidates for the general election ballot - regardless of party affiliation or non-affiliation. 2. Closed: all candidates and voters not affiliated with a party are excluded. A voter or candidate can declare affiliation with one party only. 3. Hybrid: A two stage vote tally is used to combine closed partisan primaries with a single open primary. All voters and candidates may participate regardless of party affiliation or non- affiliation. For each office, Major parties may still consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the final vote tally. There are two types of political party endorsements: 1. Nonpartisan: candidates are not allowed to declare a party affiliation on the ballot. (Used for Judiciary and other public offices where party affiliation is not appropriate. 2. Partisan: Candidates are allowed to declare party affiliation and the names of the parties endorsing the candidate are typically printed on the ballot after the candidate’s name.
What is “Political Propaganda”? There is no such thing as a “semi-closed” primary. This and similar names are typically used to confuse voters by implying that an election is open - when it is not. Political parties typically don’t support election reform and, would like voters to believe that relaxing registration requirements for closed party primaries is equivalent to free elections.
Political Propaganda is inaccurate or misleading information deliberately produced to confuse the general public.

Where we should not go.

What is a “Closed” Primary?
Lets Try voting for the greater of the two evils this time and see what happens.
Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
A “closed” primary is a type of direct primary limited to party members - voters and candidates who declare their party affiliation* in order to participate. 1. All non-affiliated candidates are excluded. 2. All non-affiliated voters are excluded. *Traditionally, voters declared party affiliation by “registering” as party members prior to the election. More recently, many states have adopted “Relaxed Registration Requirements” (R 3 ). In these states, voters are allowed to declare party affiliation by simply requesting or choosing a partisan ballot - as late as the day of the election.
There are only 3 types of primary election: 1. Open: all voters and candidates participate equally in selecting the top candidates for the general election ballot - regardless of party affiliation or non-affiliation. 2. Closed: all candidates and voters not affiliated with a party are excluded. A voter or candidate can declare affiliation with one party only. 3. Hybrid: A two stage vote tally is used to combine closed partisan primaries with a single open primary. All voters and candidates may participate regardless of party affiliation or non- affiliation. For each office, Major parties may still consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the final vote tally. There are two types of political party endorsements: 1. Nonpartisan: candidates are not allowed to declare a party affiliation on the ballot. (Used for Judiciary and other public offices where party affiliation is not appropriate. 2. Partisan: Candidates are allowed to declare party affiliation and the names of the parties endorsing the candidate are typically printed on the ballot after the candidate’s name.
What is “Political Propaganda”? There is no such thing as a “semi-closed” primary. This and similar names are typically used to confuse voters by implying that an election is open - when it is not. Political parties typically don’t support election reform and, would like voters to believe that relaxing registration requirements for closed party primaries is equivalent to free elections.
Political Propaganda is inaccurate or misleading information deliberately produced to confuse the general public.
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon